Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Otto Buck was an excellent scientist and a close personal friend. I first met Otto at the newly founded North American Aviation Science Center which I joined in April, 1964, after leaving the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Otto joined a week later from the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart, Germany. We were assigned to work together, thus beginning a wonderful experience that lasted up to his passing in November, 1997. In our collaborations, Otto emphasized the theoretical modeling aspects of the work while I emphasized the experimental. The purpose of this paper is to recall in memoriam some of the highlights of Otto’ s early contributions to the scientific literature resulting from our collaboration. The period covered extends approximately from 1964 to 1974. Previous to this time, Otto had made significant contributions to several areas in metal physics including elasticity, radiation damage, and plastic deformation studies [1–8]. Because of the memorial nature of the paper, an attempt will be made to show highlights of Otto’ s developments only and not to emphasize the individual details and rigor that always characterized Otto’ s work. The reader is referred to the original publications to extract those.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Materials Characterization

Section

Otto Buck Memorial/Materials Characterization

Pages

1617-1627

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_208

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Review of Selected Contributions to Harmonic Generation and Radiation Damage Research by Otto Buck

Snowbird, UT, USA

Otto Buck was an excellent scientist and a close personal friend. I first met Otto at the newly founded North American Aviation Science Center which I joined in April, 1964, after leaving the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Otto joined a week later from the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart, Germany. We were assigned to work together, thus beginning a wonderful experience that lasted up to his passing in November, 1997. In our collaborations, Otto emphasized the theoretical modeling aspects of the work while I emphasized the experimental. The purpose of this paper is to recall in memoriam some of the highlights of Otto’ s early contributions to the scientific literature resulting from our collaboration. The period covered extends approximately from 1964 to 1974. Previous to this time, Otto had made significant contributions to several areas in metal physics including elasticity, radiation damage, and plastic deformation studies [1–8]. Because of the memorial nature of the paper, an attempt will be made to show highlights of Otto’ s developments only and not to emphasize the individual details and rigor that always characterized Otto’ s work. The reader is referred to the original publications to extract those.