Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

It is well known that the microstructure can affect a propagating ultrasonic beam. For example, the microstructure can backscatter energy, creating noise which masks signals from small flaws. In addition, a flaw signal can be attenuated by absorption and scattering of energy. These effects can have deleterious effects on flaw detection and characterization. In addition, due to the link between backscattered grain noise, attenuation and the microstructure, measurement of these ultrasonic quantities can be used as accurate materials characterization tools if appropriate models exist. For example, Han and Thompson [1] have modeled grain noise backscattered from elongated macrograins with duplex microstructures as is commonly found in titanium alloys, allowing the prediction of backscattered grain noise as a function of frequency. In principle, it should be possible to determine grain size and shape from an experimental measurement of backscattered grain noise using their theory.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Materials Characterization

Section

Materials Properties

Pages

1717-1724

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_220

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Attenuation in Duplex Titanium Alloys

Snowbird, UT, USA

It is well known that the microstructure can affect a propagating ultrasonic beam. For example, the microstructure can backscatter energy, creating noise which masks signals from small flaws. In addition, a flaw signal can be attenuated by absorption and scattering of energy. These effects can have deleterious effects on flaw detection and characterization. In addition, due to the link between backscattered grain noise, attenuation and the microstructure, measurement of these ultrasonic quantities can be used as accurate materials characterization tools if appropriate models exist. For example, Han and Thompson [1] have modeled grain noise backscattered from elongated macrograins with duplex microstructures as is commonly found in titanium alloys, allowing the prediction of backscattered grain noise as a function of frequency. In principle, it should be possible to determine grain size and shape from an experimental measurement of backscattered grain noise using their theory.