Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

The tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used as a tool to image sample surfaces [1–3]. It has been modeled as a single degree-of-freedom nonlinear oscillator [4–11], In this model, the tip-sample interactions are described by contact theory with adhesion (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory) [12–14]. The viscoelasticity is considered as a friction force by adding a damping constant. Magonov and Elings [15] presented experimental results which show different phase sensitivity for stiff and soft samples. Anczykowski et al.[16] presented results on amplitude vs. tip-sample separation and showed the existence of hysteresis due to nonlinearity and the transition between attractive and repulsive forces. Kuhle et al [17] demonstrated experimentally the frequency response hysteresis and pointed out the effect of attractive force on this hysteresis using a linear interaction force approximation.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Materials Characterization

Section

Materials Properties

Pages

1741-1748

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_223

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Nanoscale Viscoelastic Characterization Using Tapping Mode AFM

Snowbird, UT, USA

The tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used as a tool to image sample surfaces [1–3]. It has been modeled as a single degree-of-freedom nonlinear oscillator [4–11], In this model, the tip-sample interactions are described by contact theory with adhesion (Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory) [12–14]. The viscoelasticity is considered as a friction force by adding a damping constant. Magonov and Elings [15] presented experimental results which show different phase sensitivity for stiff and soft samples. Anczykowski et al.[16] presented results on amplitude vs. tip-sample separation and showed the existence of hysteresis due to nonlinearity and the transition between attractive and repulsive forces. Kuhle et al [17] demonstrated experimentally the frequency response hysteresis and pointed out the effect of attractive force on this hysteresis using a linear interaction force approximation.