Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

In recent years, significant attention is being paid to the nation’s dilapidated infrastructure. Examples of such structures include buildings that need to be retrofitted to resist seismic loads, bridges that must be strengthened to carry heavier traffic loads and concrete water and sewer pipes that have deteriorated due to corrosions. In most of these cases, the capacity of these structures can be increased by the introduction of additional tension-carrying materials. While steel has been traditionally used for such applications, fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) materials have been increasingly replacing steel in the last decade. The high tensile strength and corrosion resistance of FRPs make them an ideal substitute for steel.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Materials Characterization

Section

Construction Materials

Pages

1911-1918

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_244

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Composite-Concrete Interface Characterization by Lamb Waves

Snowbird, UT, USA

In recent years, significant attention is being paid to the nation’s dilapidated infrastructure. Examples of such structures include buildings that need to be retrofitted to resist seismic loads, bridges that must be strengthened to carry heavier traffic loads and concrete water and sewer pipes that have deteriorated due to corrosions. In most of these cases, the capacity of these structures can be increased by the introduction of additional tension-carrying materials. While steel has been traditionally used for such applications, fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) materials have been increasingly replacing steel in the last decade. The high tensile strength and corrosion resistance of FRPs make them an ideal substitute for steel.