Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

The use of the EG&G-Heimann RTM 128 [1] or dpiX FS20 [2] amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 μm with the RTM and 127 μm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can, therefore, acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams [3], this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging [4].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 7: New Techniques and Applications

Section

New Techniques, Applications, and Devices

Pages

2073-2078

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_265

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

Snowbird, UT, USA

The use of the EG&G-Heimann RTM 128 [1] or dpiX FS20 [2] amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 μm with the RTM and 127 μm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can, therefore, acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams [3], this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging [4].