Event Title

Drum Pressure Monitor

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

At many waste sites, transuranic (TRU), low-level, and mixed wastes are stored in 55-gallon drums. Many of these drums contain hazardous, organic wastes as well. Radiolysis or other physical or chemical processes may result in gaseous emissions inside these drums. When this happens the pressure within the drum will increase, sometimes to unacceptable levels. In more drastic cases, these emissions may produce flammable or explosive atmospheres (e.g., hydrogen from radiolysis). Currently regulatory procedures require that each drum be individually opened and inspected for the presence of hazardous organic waste. This situation will be dangerous for workers if either of the conditions described above exist (high pressure or flammable atmosphere). A non-intrusive technique that would detect any increase in pressure over ambient would alert workers of potential danger and greatly increase safety. Conversely, it would allow the segregation of suspect drums, and more rapid treatment of safe drums.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 7: New Techniques and Applications

Section

New Techniques, Applications, and Devices

Pages

2087-2093

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_267

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Drum Pressure Monitor

Snowbird, UT, USA

At many waste sites, transuranic (TRU), low-level, and mixed wastes are stored in 55-gallon drums. Many of these drums contain hazardous, organic wastes as well. Radiolysis or other physical or chemical processes may result in gaseous emissions inside these drums. When this happens the pressure within the drum will increase, sometimes to unacceptable levels. In more drastic cases, these emissions may produce flammable or explosive atmospheres (e.g., hydrogen from radiolysis). Currently regulatory procedures require that each drum be individually opened and inspected for the presence of hazardous organic waste. This situation will be dangerous for workers if either of the conditions described above exist (high pressure or flammable atmosphere). A non-intrusive technique that would detect any increase in pressure over ambient would alert workers of potential danger and greatly increase safety. Conversely, it would allow the segregation of suspect drums, and more rapid treatment of safe drums.