Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

In the sequential drawing of metallic wires from an initial diameter of 196 mils (4.9 mm) to a final diameter just under 1 mil (25 μm), the wires sometimes break. Subsequent examination via TEM of broken Al wires [1] revealed that breaks occurred most often due to inclusions of Si almost as large as the wire diameter. The challenge is to devise a technique that can detect inclusions well before the wire is drawn to about the diameter of the inclusions. For example, if there is a larger diameter wire that has commercial use, and some inclusions are detected at that diameter, then the drawing-down process could be stopped at that point, and only the wires without inclusions will be drawn to smaller diameters. A different problem occurs in the manufacture of composite superconducting wires, most typically multifilament NbTi in a Cu matrix. Here the sausaging of NbTi filaments causes a reduced critical current. For this case the challenge is to devise a ]nondestructive method at room temperature for determining the integrity and quality of the NbTi filaments during or immediately after the fabrication process.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Process Control, Reliability, and Training

Section

Process Control

Pages

2265-2272

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_290

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Defect Detection in Wire Manufacturing

Snowbird, UT, USA

In the sequential drawing of metallic wires from an initial diameter of 196 mils (4.9 mm) to a final diameter just under 1 mil (25 μm), the wires sometimes break. Subsequent examination via TEM of broken Al wires [1] revealed that breaks occurred most often due to inclusions of Si almost as large as the wire diameter. The challenge is to devise a technique that can detect inclusions well before the wire is drawn to about the diameter of the inclusions. For example, if there is a larger diameter wire that has commercial use, and some inclusions are detected at that diameter, then the drawing-down process could be stopped at that point, and only the wires without inclusions will be drawn to smaller diameters. A different problem occurs in the manufacture of composite superconducting wires, most typically multifilament NbTi in a Cu matrix. Here the sausaging of NbTi filaments causes a reduced critical current. For this case the challenge is to devise a ]nondestructive method at room temperature for determining the integrity and quality of the NbTi filaments during or immediately after the fabrication process.