Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

The probability of detection (POD) plays an integral role in the management of the lives of structural components. A number of methodologies exist for determining the POD [1]. These have been used with great success in the assessment of the detectability of surface-breaking defects such as low cycle fatigue cracks. However, a few, highly visible accidents have been caused by the rupture of rotating components of commercial jet engines due to cracks initiating from naturally occurring, internal inclusions. Difficulties have been encountered in applying existent methodologies to determine the POD of such defects for reasons such as the inability to prepare samples containing known defects which reasonably simulate naturally-occurring hard-alpha inclusions. This paper provides an overview of a new methodology that has been developed to overcome these difficulties [2–4]. The methodology also provides the advantage of providing a quantitative determination of the probability of false alarms (PFA), which quantify an important aspect of the economic costs of an inspection.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Process Control, Reliability, and Training

Section

NDE Reliability Calibration

Pages

2295-2304

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_294

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Overview of the ETC POD Methodology

Snowbird, UT, USA

The probability of detection (POD) plays an integral role in the management of the lives of structural components. A number of methodologies exist for determining the POD [1]. These have been used with great success in the assessment of the detectability of surface-breaking defects such as low cycle fatigue cracks. However, a few, highly visible accidents have been caused by the rupture of rotating components of commercial jet engines due to cracks initiating from naturally occurring, internal inclusions. Difficulties have been encountered in applying existent methodologies to determine the POD of such defects for reasons such as the inability to prepare samples containing known defects which reasonably simulate naturally-occurring hard-alpha inclusions. This paper provides an overview of a new methodology that has been developed to overcome these difficulties [2–4]. The methodology also provides the advantage of providing a quantitative determination of the probability of false alarms (PFA), which quantify an important aspect of the economic costs of an inspection.