Event Title

Transient Electromagnetic Fields in Highly Conductive Media

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

It can be readily demonstrated that the spatial and time dependences of an electromagnetic field in highly conductive media are governed by the diffusion equation [1, 2, 3]. It can be also easily shown that this equation is satisfied by the damped wave solutions having a complex wave vector causing attenuation over distance [1, 2, 4]. Such is basically a fact that can be intuitively predicted; the amplitude of an electromagnetic field with time and spatial harmonics entering a good conductor attenuates rapidly due to eddy current loss while its phase at a given location changes in time as the field advances. To make this picture valid, one must prove that measurable field amplitude exists after the wave front has traveled a sufficient distance. In case of pulsed eddy current test this distance is usually twice the specimen thickness.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Electromagnetic, Thermal, and X-Ray Techniques

Section

Eddy Current Modelling

Pages

523-529

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_66

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Transient Electromagnetic Fields in Highly Conductive Media

Snowbird, UT, USA

It can be readily demonstrated that the spatial and time dependences of an electromagnetic field in highly conductive media are governed by the diffusion equation [1, 2, 3]. It can be also easily shown that this equation is satisfied by the damped wave solutions having a complex wave vector causing attenuation over distance [1, 2, 4]. Such is basically a fact that can be intuitively predicted; the amplitude of an electromagnetic field with time and spatial harmonics entering a good conductor attenuates rapidly due to eddy current loss while its phase at a given location changes in time as the field advances. To make this picture valid, one must prove that measurable field amplitude exists after the wave front has traveled a sufficient distance. In case of pulsed eddy current test this distance is usually twice the specimen thickness.