Event Title

Wave Scattering from Surface-Breaking Cracks Sonified by a Linear Phased Array

Location

Snowbird, UT, USA

Start Date

1-1-1999 12:00 AM

Description

In earlier papers [1, 2], the authors have presented theoretical and experimental results for the generation of focused surface wave motion by a linear array of surface wave transducers. It was shown that a single element generates a beam with an opening angle of approximately 20°, and a cross section which can be accurately represented by a Gaussian distribution of the normal displacements. For an eight-element array, the focused beam was modeled by superposition considerations. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental results, where the latter were obtained by the use of a laser interferometer [3], showed excellent agreement for the normal displacement both along a radial line and across the width of the beam. The transducer array with a center frequency of 5MHz was used for surface-defect detection, whereby the focal region was automatically adjusted to the defect location [4].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

18A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Elastic Waves and Ultrasonic Techniques

Section

Scattering/Propagation

Pages

71-78

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-4791-4_8

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Wave Scattering from Surface-Breaking Cracks Sonified by a Linear Phased Array

Snowbird, UT, USA

In earlier papers [1, 2], the authors have presented theoretical and experimental results for the generation of focused surface wave motion by a linear array of surface wave transducers. It was shown that a single element generates a beam with an opening angle of approximately 20°, and a cross section which can be accurately represented by a Gaussian distribution of the normal displacements. For an eight-element array, the focused beam was modeled by superposition considerations. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental results, where the latter were obtained by the use of a laser interferometer [3], showed excellent agreement for the normal displacement both along a radial line and across the width of the beam. The transducer array with a center frequency of 5MHz was used for surface-defect detection, whereby the focal region was automatically adjusted to the defect location [4].