Start Date

2016 12:00 AM

Description

IRIS (Internal Rotary Inspection System) has become a major maintenance inspection technique for the heat exchanger and reactor tubes. It is known that IRIS has a high precision of evaluation thickness, however there are a few disadvantages, such as slow inspection speed. Therefore, we have developed a magnetic eddy current flaw testing technique which combines a magnetic array forming a strong magnetic field, 4 coil structures for controlling the generation area of the eddy currents, and a desorption yoke structure to control the magnetizing force. This technique is capable of inspecting ferromagnetic tubes with high-speed and can be considered as an alternative inspection method to IRIS[1, 2]. The performance of this technique, through holes with a diameter of 0.5 mm (φ) could be detected as small defects with a high S/N ratio (See Fig.1). In addition, the occurrence, location and size of defects could be evaluated qualitatively based on the phase characterization of our developed magnetic eddy current probe (See Fig.2). In this presentation, details of this technique and practical application will be elaborated.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Development of Magnetic Eddy Current Testing Techniques

IRIS (Internal Rotary Inspection System) has become a major maintenance inspection technique for the heat exchanger and reactor tubes. It is known that IRIS has a high precision of evaluation thickness, however there are a few disadvantages, such as slow inspection speed. Therefore, we have developed a magnetic eddy current flaw testing technique which combines a magnetic array forming a strong magnetic field, 4 coil structures for controlling the generation area of the eddy currents, and a desorption yoke structure to control the magnetizing force. This technique is capable of inspecting ferromagnetic tubes with high-speed and can be considered as an alternative inspection method to IRIS[1, 2]. The performance of this technique, through holes with a diameter of 0.5 mm (φ) could be detected as small defects with a high S/N ratio (See Fig.1). In addition, the occurrence, location and size of defects could be evaluated qualitatively based on the phase characterization of our developed magnetic eddy current probe (See Fig.2). In this presentation, details of this technique and practical application will be elaborated.