Start Date

2016 12:00 AM

Description

Organic matrix composites (OMCs) are increasingly being integrated into aircraft structures. However, these components are susceptible to impact related delamination, which, on aircrafts, can occur due to a number of reasons during aircraft use and maintenance. Quantifying impact damage is an important aspect for life-management of aircraft and requires in-depth knowledge of the damage zone on a ply-by-ply level. Traditionally, immersion ultrasound has provided relative high resolution images of impact damage. Ultrasonic time-of-flight data can be used to determine the front surface delamination depth and an approximation of the delaminated area. However, such inspections require the material to be immersed in water and can be time consuming. The objective of this work is to develop a quick and robust methodology to nondestructively characterize multi-layered impact damage using thermography. Thermal excitation pulse parameters such as duration, shape, and energy are optimized for maximum contrast between damaged and undamaged material. The anticipated outcome of this project is to extract features of delaminations as function of depth. Initial results are shown and future efforts are discussed.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Characterization of Multi-layered Impact Damage in Organic Matrix Composites Using Thermography

Organic matrix composites (OMCs) are increasingly being integrated into aircraft structures. However, these components are susceptible to impact related delamination, which, on aircrafts, can occur due to a number of reasons during aircraft use and maintenance. Quantifying impact damage is an important aspect for life-management of aircraft and requires in-depth knowledge of the damage zone on a ply-by-ply level. Traditionally, immersion ultrasound has provided relative high resolution images of impact damage. Ultrasonic time-of-flight data can be used to determine the front surface delamination depth and an approximation of the delaminated area. However, such inspections require the material to be immersed in water and can be time consuming. The objective of this work is to develop a quick and robust methodology to nondestructively characterize multi-layered impact damage using thermography. Thermal excitation pulse parameters such as duration, shape, and energy are optimized for maximum contrast between damaged and undamaged material. The anticipated outcome of this project is to extract features of delaminations as function of depth. Initial results are shown and future efforts are discussed.