Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

1975

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

Abstract

Throughout six years as a supervisor in an English curriculum in Grades 7–12, where I have observed thirty teachers each year advancing communication skills in classrooms, a thought—or question—has recurred like an ache somewhere in the body. The question, never answered and rarely treated, has been, "Of what benefit will this study be to these children in life, particularly in adult life?" Attendance at six consecutive conventions of the National Council of Teachers of English has not produced much in the way of alleviation of the discomfort. Neither have four convention experiences as a program participant: programs which have dealt with writing essays (twice), duties of a department chairperson, and a session for supervisors and coordinators. In fact, the subject of adult needs has never been treated in those experiences. Much has been said of "relevance" in recent years, so much in fact that the word brings knowing smiles to the faces of teachers. "Relevance" always has seemed to mean materials of high-motivation, very much related or similar to the teen-ager's life and interests, with little substance to thrust the teen-ager out of his or her provincial world into something broader and closer to what is defined as education.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-6045

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu

Copyright Owner

Lawrence Jerome Geisler

Language

en

Date Available

June 3, 2013

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

49 pages

Share

COinS