Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1994

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

John Wilson

Second Advisor

Robert Mazur

Abstract

This study investigated the utilization of academic support programs by African students at Iowa State University. The subjects were 75 African students from 42 countries who were enrolled at Iowa State University during Spring of 1987 to Spring of 1988. The students surveyed were approximately 56.0% of total African students enrolled. New students were not included in the study. Students who participated were enrolled in the following colleges: Agriculture, Business Administration, Design, Education, Engineering, Family and Consumer Sciences, and Science and Humanities;The purpose of the study was to determine whether or not the utilization of academic support programs by African students was due to the following factors: (a) gender, (b) age, (c) marital status, (d) length of time at Iowa State University, (e) English used as an official language in home country, (f) TOEFL score, and (g) degree student is pursuing;The dependent variables used for this study were: (a) problems/needs the African students expressed, (b) what motivated them to utilize academic support programs, (c) level of participation (why they did not participate or participate more), (d) barriers they encountered, and (e) satisfaction with academic support programs;The data were analyzed using item-by-item frequency of responses, coefficient of reliabilities, and cross-tabulation. Chi-square was used to find the relationships between the background information and the principal issues (problems/needs, motivation, participation, barriers, and satisfaction with academic support programs);The following conclusions were drawn based upon the findings of the study;The only significant relationships were between gender and participation, and between gender and barriers. Also of interest, the study found that females are more likely to use academic support programs than males. The study also revealed that males perceived fewer barriers to use academic support programs than females. Interestingly enough, the study found that although the African students knew about the existence of the academic support programs, they did not use them;However, the study did not find any significant relationships between age, marital status, length of time at Iowa State University, English as an official language spoken in home country and TOEFL scores with the principal issues;Implications are presented and recommendations for practice and further research provided.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-10063

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Robson Mushambi

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9518465

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

115 pages

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