Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1996

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

William K. Poston

Abstract

Forty-four Iowa school board presidents and superintendents from the same school districts were surveyed to investigate and analyze perceptions of the manner in which superintendents are currently being awarded salary increases and the preferred or ideal manner in which salary increases should be awarded. Secondly, a sample of board members, administrators, teachers, students, and support staff from these same forty-four school districts were asked to respond to a Perceived Quality instrument concerning a quality rating of the school districts. The results of these surveys were composed to determine whether a correlation existed between the current and ideal manner of awarding salary increases to superintendents and the perceived quality rating of the school. This study was implemented to test the theory of W. Edwards Deming that merit or performance will destroy the organization;The results of the study indicate the following conclusions in the current practice of awarding salary increases: (1) Board presidents and superintendents agreed that increases or decreases in student population have little effect in determining salary increases. (2) Board presidents and superintendents felt that teacher negotiated contract settlements have a large impact on the superintendent's salary increase. (3) Board presidents and superintendents agreed that standardized testing should not be used in determining salary increases. (4) Board presidents and, to a lesser degree, superintendents felt that the superintendent's performance on the job description has an impact on salary increases;In the ideal or preferred manner of awarding superintendent salary increases, the following was found: (1) Increase or decrease of student population should have little effect on salary increases. (2) Board presidents felt that the superintendent's salary increase should be related to the teacher negotiated contract settlement, while superintendents felt that the superintendent's salary increase should be separate from the teacher negotiated settlement. (3) Board presidents felt that the performance on the job description should be heavily considered for salary increases. Superintendents placed a significantly lower level of importance than do board presidents for compensation increases based upon job performance. Both board presidents and superintendents agreed that standardized test scores should not be a factor. (4) A slight negative correlation was found when comparing the perceived quality rating of a school district with performance-based pay for the superintendent. This finding may bind some credibility to Deming's theory that performance or merit pay may have a negative influence on the organization.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-10219

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Thomas John Behounek

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9620966

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

98 pages

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