Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1994

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Fred H. Borgen

Second Advisor

Norman A. Scott

Abstract

This study examined the effects of parental alcoholism, gender, and family environment on alcohol use patterns and psychological adjustment of a non-clinical sample of college students. Participants were 543 students from introductory psychology courses at a large midwestern university. Adult children of alcoholics (ACAs) were found to have greater perceived external locus of control and greater problematic alcohol use than adult children of non-alcoholics. These findings were primarily attributable to differences in gender and family functioning. No significant differences were found between ACAs and non-ACAs in self-esteem, self-realization, or motives for drinking. When compared with parental alcoholism, gender and family functioning proved to be better predictors of college student outcomes. These findings suggest that identification of persons as ACAs has limited utility in predicting alcohol use patterns and psychological adjustment, particularly within college settings.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-10347

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Richard Allen Martin

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9518415

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

168 pages

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