Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2000

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

Gary D. Phye

Abstract

In the debate over the impact of technology and instructional methods on student learner outcomes, there has been no clear winner. This study utilized path analysis techniques to examine these effects. Data was gathered from 6 middle school mathematics classes including 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students (N = 372). Discriminant analysis showed significant differences between the groups, but the model elements captured that variance well enough to predict group membership correctly 82% of the time. Exogenous model elements included socio-economic status, math problem solving achievement, math concepts achievement, motivation for learning math, and score on math exemplar one. Endogenous variables were volume of technology use, self-efficacy with technology, the Internet, and scores on exemplars two and three. The reduced model predicted 41% of the scores on exemplar three and produced a non-significant chi square (chi 2 = 16.75, P = .471). Results were mixed regarding the impact of both technology and instructional methods, with some significant path coefficients supporting each allegation. Recommendations for further research include replication of this study using different content areas and technologies which serve as cognitive tools. References included.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-13655

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Caryl Louise Bender

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9992448

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

62 pages

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