Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2000

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

Walter H. Gmelch

Second Advisor

Daniel C. Robinson

Abstract

The purpose of this study was: (1) to generate an understanding of the daily administrative processes (activities) of the college of education dean; and (2) to generate a theory based on the delineated roles of the dean as it relates to the executive behavior of the position during the work day. Upon the collection of data determining the dean's executive behavior a comparative analysis using role theory between the dean's executive roles and executive roles found by Mintzberg (1973) was provided. The roles were then aggregated to form the executive behavior of academic deans;Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were both employed in this research. A field study methodology borrowed from the discipline of anthropology was used to collect structured (quantitative) and unstructured observation (qualitative) data on four college of education deans. The specific methods emphasized are structured observations, and unstructured observations. The structured data was collected in one area: chronology records. The chronology record was designed to provide basic data on the design of the work day and to provide a reference to the field notes (unstructured data);After undertaking the data analysis of each kind of activity for this study Mintzberg's roles were reaffirmed; however, additional roles were added and categorized in order to accommodate academic deans. To support the academic executive behavioral theory presented, it was necessary to describe rigorously the activities of academic deans. The primary focus was to recount the activities the deans were observed performing, and secondarily offer suggestions on why these activities occurred. To provide a theoretical grounding to guide the analysis of the data, the sociology of time was employed. The overarching findings from both sets of data demonstrate that academic deans adhere closely to Mintzberg's executive behavioral theory.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-13954

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Jerlando F. L. Jackson

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9977329

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

153 pages

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