Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1938

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Abstract

Studies were made of suitable methods of producing plastics from furfural and hydrolyzed cornstalks. It was found that hard, black plastics with a pleasing appearance, high impact strength, and satisfactory water resistance can be produced from a mixture of hydrolyzed cornstalks, furfural, aniline and lime. This material absorbed slightly more than one percent of water in twenty-four hours but it was not discolored, swollen or cracked from the immersion in water. It was estimated that the raw material costs of this plastic would be less than three cents a pound;It was found that hard, black plastics with a pleasing appearance, fairly high impact strength, and satisfactory resistance to water can be produced from a mixture of hydrolyzed oat hulls, furfural, aniline, and lime. This material absorbed more than one percent of water in twenty-four hours, but it was not discolored, swollen or cracked from the immersion in water. The method and extent of hydrolysis is important in determining the properties of the material made from the hydrolyzed hulls. It is believed that the hydrolysis could be carried out in such a manner that considerable quantities of furfural could be recovered from the hulls and still leave a residue suitable for the preparation of cheap plastics. It was estimated that the raw material costs of plastics from oat hulls, without recovery of furfural, would be slightly more than 3.5 cents per pound;It was found that resins can be produced from combinations of furfural, lignin, and aniline or urea. These resins can be mixed with a suitable filler and molded under eat and pressure to hard, black, materials that have a pleasing appearance. It is believed that the optimum conditions for the preparation of such resins were not found in this study. The materials produced, however, did have moderate strength and satisfactory water resistance;It is believed that the plastics produced from hydrolyzed cornstalks, hydrolyzed oat hulls, or lignin had properties such that they could be produced to compete with some of the plastics now used commercially.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-14873

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

James Alvin Johnston

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAIDP12468

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

239 pages

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