Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2007

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Jill D. Pruetz

Abstract

Social interactions between adult male and immature chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes) have been understudied compared to those between mothers and their offspring. This study's aim was to gain a better understanding of such relationships among a population of wild West African chimpanzees (P. t. verus). Although overall rates of affiliation between adult males and immatures were low, low-ranking males engaged in such interactions significantly more than higher ranking males. Additionally, males tended to favor the offspring of certain females, although this difference was not statistically significant. It has been suggested that male care in many primate species may serve as a mating strategy. Unlike higher ranking males who engage in displays, low-ranking males may increase their 'attractiveness' to females by demonstrating their abilities as care-givers. This hypothesis may explain the findings of the current study; low-ranking chimpanzee males may direct affiliative behavior towards infants and juveniles to gain reproductive benefits.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-15990

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Margaret Ellen Robinson

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1443156

OCLC Number

163575927

ISBN

9781109818697

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

114 pages

Included in

Anthropology Commons

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