Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2007

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Matthew G. Hill

Abstract

Oneota exploitation of bison, elk, and deer is not well documented. Analysis of the remains of these animals from the Howard Goodhue site helps to address specific questions concerning the procurement, transport and post-transport processing of carcass remains. Results are interpreted through predictions of optimal foraging models such as Central Place Foraging and the Marginal Value Theorem. Inferences are bolstered by the environmental context of the late Holocene and with middle range observations of historic and modern hunter-gatherer behaviors. Documentation of the remains demonstrates a complex taphonomic history with extensive dual-patterning responsible for the high level of fragmentation observed. Twenty-three deer and 5 large ungulates were identified. The skeletal element frequencies suggest that deer were captured close to the village and transported relatively complete, whereas bison and elk were captured farther away and brought back in select carcass packages. Highly fragmented, spirally fractured marrow-bearing elements suggest increased processing intensity for within-bone nutrients.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16161

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Jeremy Nathan Hall

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1444586

OCLC Number

166881350

ISBN

9780549053446

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

162 pages

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