Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Patrick I. Armstrong

Second Advisor

David Vogel

Third Advisor

Levon Esters

Abstract

Gottfredson's (1981) developmental theory of career choices was evaluated using longitudinal data. This study builds on previous research into Gottfredson's model by addressing methodological issues in the confounding of sex type, prestige, and interest measures when measuring expressed career choices by statistically controlling for the inter-relations among these variables in the analyses. Participants were 2,353 women enrolled at the Seven College Conference Schools and 321 men enrolled at Harvard and Vassar. Expressed career preferences were coded for sex type, prestige, and the Things/People and Data/Ideas interest dimension. Stability of expressed career choices over a one year period and discrepancies between current career choices and idealized aspirations were analyzed using partial correlation analyses to control for the non-independence of the constructs. Gottfredson's (1981) theory was not supported for either men or women, because prestige and the Things/People dimension of interest were found to be more stable than sex type. Implications for re-conceptualizing Gottfredson's theory are discussed, along with implications for research and practice.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16431

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Kate E. Junk

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1453114

OCLC Number

235949802

ISBN

9780549541844

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

77 pages

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