Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

Theses & dissertations (Interdisciplinary)

Major

Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies

First Advisor

Brenda O. Daly

Second Advisor

Joseph Kupfer

Third Advisor

Diane Price-Herndl

Abstract

Debates about human cloning are typically argued within a framework of individual rights and justice that promote a particular view of human independence. As a result, the cloning debate is impoverished because it fails to adequately consider human interdependence. Rather than considering whether we have a right to clone, feminist care ethics offers the question, is it caring to clone? To explore questions of social and political care ethics within the cloning debate, this thesis examines two contemporary speculative novels, Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake (2003) and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (2005), which represent uses of human cloning that function as an ineffective cure for the social and political care that is missing in the U.S. and the U.K. These novels also suggest that the ethics of care as a social and political theory may be advanced by broadening civic discourse to involve the arts and humanities.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16547

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Laurel A. Tweed

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1453131

OCLC Number

235266907

ISBN

9780549542018

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

105 pages

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