Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Theses & dissertations (Interdisciplinary)

Major

Human Computer Interaction

First Advisor

Steven M. Herrnstadt

Second Advisor

Anson B. Call

Third Advisor

Debra J. Satterfield

Abstract

The creation of video game levels is an inexact and often intuitive process. Currently, much of level design focuses on the "how" as opposed to the "why." That is to say, level designers know how to build a level, but do not know why they built it the way they did. Before more immersive player experiences can occur, an understanding of what levels are, what common functionality exists between them, and a means of consistently reproducing player behaviors is necessary.;The author advances the premise that by examining the use of design patterns in architecture, computer science, and interaction design, a foundation can be created to better characterize commonly occurring problems and solutions within level design. When multiple patterns are applied, the group becomes a language. This language can then be used as a means for creating novel levels as well as a lexicon for analyzing existing games.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16576

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Denise Bacher

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1453167

OCLC Number

243466050

ISBN

9780549543428

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

57 pages

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