Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

First Advisor

Leland Poague

Second Advisor

Geoffrey Sauer

Third Advisor

David Zimmerman

Abstract

Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet, consisting of four books---Justine (1957), Balthazar (1958), Mountolive (1959), and Clea (1960)---has long been overlooked academic literary criticism and Durrell's works have largely failed to enter Western canon due to their curious and indefinite status within the literary movements of the twentieth century. This thesis locates the Quartet at the historical and ideological confluence of the major literary philosophies of the century---modernism and postmodernism. Durrell's work seems to exhibit modernist techniques, such as anxiety, uncertainty and the lack of an authoritative viewpoint, as well as themes of human memory, attention to Freudian psychology and a belief in the possibility of salvation through art, but at the same time demonstrates many postmodern features, including metafictional traits, intertextuality, and pastiche, in addition to elements of Lacanian psychoanalytic theory. The Alexandria Quartet thus serves as an important transitional work in twentieth century literature.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16591

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Tyler John Niska

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1453897

OCLC Number

256493562

ISBN

9780549595502

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

91 pages

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