Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

First Advisor

Dan Douglas

Second Advisor

Cristina Pardo-Ballester

Third Advisor

John M. Levis

Abstract

This study investigates whether language and nonlanguage factors affect international undergraduates' perceptions of international teaching assistants (ITAs). Fifty-five students enrolled in first-year composition classes listened to a short lecture under one of three guises related to nationality of the speaker and rated the lecture and the speaker based on eight response variables. Results indicate that the information provided to participants about the nationality of the speaker did not influence their perception of both lecture and speaker. However, when participants' variables were analyzed, statistically significant results were found for two response variables: accent and speaker likeability. The results for accent indicate that the actual degree of accentedness that participants perceived in the speaker's speech, not nationality, influenced their ratings. As for likeability of the speaker, raters favored the supposed Brazilian TA. This finding may be related to stereotypes of Brazilian people and culture worldwide or to previous sociocultural experiences that participants may have had with Brazilian individuals.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-16690

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Edna de Freitas Lima

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1454661

OCLC Number

268661902

ISBN

9780549686408

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

90 pages

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