Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2005

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

David L. Vogel

Second Advisor

Susan X Day

Abstract

The rise in popularity and use of computer-mediated modes of communication such as email and synchronous chat have resulted in the potential for new delivery methods of mental health services. The present study investigated the dynamics of an initial counseling session held in a synchronous chat environment between therapists-in-training at various graduate programs across the country and a trained confederate posing as a client. Transcripts from the online sessions were analyzed to investigate therapist responses and interventions in the online environment. Therapists-in-training were also asked to respond to questions concerning their satisfaction with the experience, the relationship they were able to form with the client, and previous online experience. Participants gave an assessment of the client and responded to statements about online counseling. Results demonstrate that the therapists-in-training expressed more positive views about online counseling after they had conducted the session in terms of the potential for a therapeutic alliance and desire for future training; however, participants expressed more negative views about the amount of work that could be accomplished during online counseling sessions. Therapists-in-training were also able to accurately diagnose their client's presenting concerns at the conclusion of the session. The implications for the future directions of online counseling research and practice are addressed.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-4

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu

Copyright Owner

Michael John Mallen

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI3184639

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

105 pages

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