Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

2008

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

First Advisor

Larry H. Ebbers

Second Advisor

Virginia Arthur

Third Advisor

Marta M. Maldonado

Abstract

National data suggest that Latina immigrant women fare better educationally than their nonimmigrant counterparts in bachelor degree attainment, but does not account for how immigration status impacts college persistence. Using a borderlands theoretical framework, this study examines factors associated with college persistence among a sample of undocumented Mexican immigrant women from a small rural community in the Rocky Mountain region. Chicana feminist epistemological techniques are used to analyze data collected from in-depth interviews from participants and community informants. In addition, a trenzas de identidades multiples (braids of multiple identities) perspective was used helped conceptualize and categorize persistence factors surrounding and intersecting with culture, family, educational resources, and immigrant experiences; six themes emerged from this study: (a) support and challenges from their home system; (b) unraveling the notions of dual socialization; (c) microaggressions against newcomers; (d) learning and unlearning from the language acquisition process; (e) dilemmas, stressors, and motivation associated with undocumented status; and (f) creating successful academic spaces and social networks in college. Recommendations for K-12 administrators, Latino/a community members, higher education, and policy are discussed as well as recommendations for future study.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-17024

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Susana Maria Muñoz

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI3316177

OCLC Number

276297821

ISBN

9780549688075

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

203 pages

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