Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2005

Degree Name

Master of Arts

Department

English

First Advisor

Laura Winkiel

Abstract

T.S. Eliot arrived in continental Europe in the summer of 1914 as a Harvard philosophy student preparing for his Ph.D.: he would spend the war as a banker in London, and would emerge in 1918 as a poet. He was never a soldier - America did not enter until 1917, and he only belatedly attempted to receive a commission in the United States Navy near the war's eventual conclusion a year later- but Eliot experienced the war: as a civilian in wartime London, as a man concerned with the fate of Western culture and history, and as a poet who wrote of a dead friend and a devastated land. The Waste Land has been considered the outpouring of a sensitive soul's grief and fear, or the general expression of the disillusionment and anxiety of an age, or as the elegy of a dead friend. The poem is all of these, but it is also more: it is, fundamentally, a war poem, written for a war that ushered in a new era where the old distinction between civilian and soldier became less meaningful. ''If I have not seen the battle field," remarked Eliot in 1917, "I have seen other strange things".

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-5658

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu

Copyright Owner

Jeffrey Alan Arp

Language

en

Date Available

September 10, 2013

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

79 pages

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