Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

1-1-2003

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management

Major

Foodservice and Lodging Management

Abstract

Food safety is a critical issue facing the foodservice industry. Foodservice workers play a major role in the preventing outbreaks of foodborne illness and meeting the goal of serving safe food. The purpose of this study was to assess foodservice employees' knowledge, attitudes, practices, and training regarding food safety at one university. Comparisons of food safety knowledge, attitudes, practices, and training were made between student and full-time employees. Two questionnaires were used for this study. A 5-part questionnaire was developed to assess student and full-time employees' food safety knowledge, attitudes, practices, and training. A 1-page questionnaire was sent to Iowa State University Dining managers to determine food safety topics included in training or orientation for student employees, and to determine perceptions of student employees' food safety practices compared to those of full-time employees. Student employees returned 221 questionnaires for a 40% response rate. Thirty-eight questionnaires were completed by full-time employees for a 42% response rate. Sixteen questionnaires were completed by managers for an 84% response rate. SPSS 11.0 for Windows was used for data analysis. ANOVA examined differences in food safety knowledge, attitudes, practices, and training between student and full-time employees. ANOVA and correlations assessed relationships among employees' demographic characteristics and mean total scores for food safety knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Multiple linear regression tested relationships among employees' food safety knowledge, attitudes, practices, training, and demographic variables. Full-time employees had higher (p[less than or equal to]0.001) mean total scores for food safety knowledge, attitudes, practices, and training than student employees. Student employees lacked knowledge about the importance of handwashing, time and temperature control, and sanitizer concentrations. Student employees lacked training about preventing cross contamination and the temperature danger zone. Student employees' food safety knowledge, attitudes, and training have a significant positive influence on their food safety practices (p[less than or equal to]0.001). Emphasis on food safety training for student employees is needed to ensure these employees have appropriate food safety knowledge and attitudes and to make sure practices are followed. Managers need to consider strengthening training related to proper handwashing procedures, time and temperature control, cross contamination, and sanitizer concentrations for student employees.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-20200716-45

Copyright Owner

Shu-Ying Lin

Language

en

OCLC Number

54889072

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

96 pages

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