Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

1-1-2003

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Botany

Major

Botany

Abstract

Cultivated cotton fiber has undergone a dramatic transformation from the short, brown trichomes found in closely related wild species to the economically important long, white trichomes grown throughout the world today. Very little is known about the development of wild cotton fiber or the developmental differences between wild and cultivated cotton fibers. This study looks at the amount of fiber on the ovule coat, nucleus position, presence of the vacuole, fiber size, fiber shape, and the driving force behind size and shape differences in four taxa-Gossypium raimondii (wild D-genome), G. herbaceum var. Wagad (cultivated A-genome), G. hirsutum var. yucatanense (wild tetraploid), and G. hirsutum var. Maxxa (cultivated tetraploid)-using a variety of morphometric and statistical methods. Significant changes in the timing of developmental events show a synchronization of fiber development in G. hirsutum var. Maxxa compared to all other taxa, while the other cultivar, G. herbaceum var. Wagad shows a delay in developmental events and the wild taxa have timing intermediate to the cultivars. The phylogenetic relationship is found to be the primary driving force behind size and shape, however, domestication becomes a force at later days of development.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-20200803-140

Copyright Owner

Kara Michelle Butterworth

Language

en

OCLC Number

54938085

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

43 pages

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