Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

1-1-2003

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Major

Agricultural Engineering (Agricultural Power and Machinery)

Abstract

Formal methods are needed in correctly predicting the performance of reciprocating cutter bars. Theoretical, laboratory, and field methods were investigated to predict the performance of four cutter bars, two production and two prototype. The theoretical analysis was implemented using a MathCAD model based on prior works, and generated performance curves based on levels of inefficient cutting. Laboratory testing consisted of cutting match stick bamboo at various velocities from 3 to 12 mph and recording stubble height measurements. The resulting measurements were statistically analyzed to determine performance curves for stubble height, and evenness of cut. Finally, field testing was done using a composite cutter bar containing all four cutter bars designs, and measurements of stubble height were taken at velocities ranging from 6-10.5 mph. The results were statistically analyzed, and performance curves for the stubble height and evenness of cut were generated. The performance curves were analyzed, and it was found that the methods for laboratory and field testing produced similar results whereas the theoretical analysis produced some outcomes that could not be directly related to the other tests. Laboratory and field results concluded that the two prototype cutter bars out performed the two production ones.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-20200803-183

Copyright Owner

Wayne T Flickinger

Language

en

OCLC Number

74491181

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

160 pages

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