Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1980

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies

Abstract

This research was designed to determine why adults attend beginning clothing construction classes, if adults would select beginning clothing construction classes if other courses were available, and if selected variables are related to adult motives. One hundred ninety-nine adults enrolled in beginning clothing construction classes in Iowa public schools or the area community colleges responded to questionnaires which contained 63 reasons for enrolling in the class. Response rate was 91 percent;Factor analysis procedures identified six clusters of interrelated items from 50 of the 63 items. An inspection was made to determine items with a factor loading of equal to or greater than plus or minus .35. Clusters were further refined by inspecting the rational content of the items and by assigning an item to the cluster on which it had the highest factor loading. Reliability of the six clusters ranged from .67 to .87. Overall reliability of the 63 items was .93. The six clusters of reasons for attending beginning clothing construction classes in descending order of importance were: economics, enjoyment of learning, learning for application, personal goal, leisure and sociability;An analysis of variance was used to determine influence of demographic variables upon six clusters of reasons for attending adult beginning clothing construction classes. There were significant differences between the following clusters and variables: leisure and age; learning for application, age and marital status; personal goal and marital status; sociability, place of residence and income; economics, educational level and marital status; leisure and ownership of a sewing machine; personal goal and ownership of a sewing machine, and enjoyment of learning and occupation;Analysis of variance was used to determine influence of the demographic variables upon interest of respondents in attending nine classes in Home Economics; There were significant differences with the variable age and the classes, child care and development, family resources, meal management, children's clothing and family relationships. There were significant differences with the variable, level of education and the classes, children's clothing, consumer education, and family relationships;Chi-squares were calculated to determine significant differences between variables and alternative classes respondents might have taken. Age was significant with alternative class. Chi-squares were calculated to determine significant differences between variables and the next class respondents would like to take. Age and educational level were significant with the next class;Respondents would select clothing construction classes if they enrolled for another class. Decorating your home and children's clothing were the next most important classes. Child care and development and family relationships were the least important. Respondents were uncertain about consumer education.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-3568

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Edna Riley Bell Mount

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8106033

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

147 pages

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