Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1981

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies

Abstract

Purposes were to: (1) develop a valid food and nutrition questionnaire for parents, (2) identify certain nutrition attitudes of parents, (3) assess parents' knowledge of nutrition, (4) identify some food purchasing practices of parents, (5) compare parents' nutrition attitudes, knowledge, and food purchasing practices by selected demographic characteristics, and (6) examine relationships among parents' nutrition attitudes, knowledge, and food purchasing practices;Data were collected by means of a questionnaire which consisted of four major parts: general information, attitudes, knowledge, and practices. Data were analyzed from 1,769 parents who had preschool children attending day care centers and/or family day care homes in Iowa. Data analysis included descriptive statistics; one-way analysis of variance to determine differences in parents' nutrition attitudes, knowledge, and food purchasing practices by independent variables; Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient to determine relationships among the dependent variables; step wise regression techniques, and the estimated reliability of the knowledge scale (r = .64), attitude scale (r = .74), and food purchasing practices scale (r = .78);Significant differences ( p (LESSTHEQ) .01) were found in parents' nutrition attitudes by sex, educational level, family size, and nutrition training. Significant differences were found in parents' nutrition knowledge based on age, sex, education level, occupation, nutrition training, and amount of money spent on food eaten outside the home. Sex, nutrition training, occupation, and amount of money spent on food eaten outside the home made a significant difference in parents' food purchasing practices. A positive and significant correlation was found among nutrition attitudes, knowledge, and food purchasing practices. Nutrition attitudes were more strongly related to food purchasing practices than nutrition knowledge;Step wise regression analysis showed that nutrition training, sex, education level, and family size explained 11% of the variance in parents' nutrition attitudes. Twenty-two percent of the variance in parents' nutrition knowledge was explained by education level, nutrition training, sex, and age. Nutrition attitudes, sex, money spent on food eaten outside the home, family size, nutrition training, residence, and knowledge, respectively, explained 28% of the variance in parents' food purchasing practices.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-11138

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Margaret Janet McKenzie Kelly

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8128833

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

152 pages

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