Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1984

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Agricultural Education and Studies

Abstract

During two successive semesters, 103 college students in a BASIC programming course were enrolled in classes which were randomly assigned as experimental or control groups. The control group received instruction by the traditional lecture method, while the experimental group received instruction by computer-assisted instructional materials. All students were given a pretest and posttest measuring knowledge of BASIC computer programming and computer use, a pretest and posttest measuring attitude toward computers and computer use, and a survey to obtain demographic data on the students. From an analysis of covariance, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) There was no significant difference in attitude or knowledge scores when the students were grouped by teaching method; (2) There was a significant difference in posttest knowledge scores when the students were grouped by pretest attitude score, semesters of vocational agriculture, subject in which the students made their highest and lowest grade in high school, average secondary and post-secondary math grade, student classification, student major, video game experience, occupational plans, or the person that most influenced the student to take the course; (3) There was a significant difference in posttest attitude scores when the students were grouped by typing ability, or computer experience.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-5142

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Timothy A. Wiggins

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8423752

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

122 pages

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