Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1985

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Education

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to assess to what degree management plays a significant role in the running of English departments and to determine the level of importance and the level of implementation of selected management activities in English departments at four-year, state-supported colleges and universities as perceived by department executive officers (DEOs) and faculty members;The population of the study was composed of English DEOs and faculty members from institutions in the United States that were state-supported, had a department or division of English, a student enrollment of at least 12,000, a full-time faculty of 20 members or more and at least bachelor's and master's degree programs;Returns were received from 70 out of 120 DEOs and 68 out of 120 faculty members. Along with demographic information, the survey instrument assessed the level of importance and the level of implementation of five management functions: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Each of these functions contained four management activities for a total of 20 activities that were rated by the DEOs and faculty members on a Likert-type scale. The instrument also asked respondents to rank the importance of the five management functions and to select the most and least important department activities from a list of 11 activities. Statistical procedures used in analyzing the data included frequencies, paired t-tests and one-way analysis of variance;Based on data from the study, it was concluded that: (1) the DEOs and the faculty members agreed that all five management functions and the 20 activities listed under those five functions were important in managing an English department; (2) the faculty members rated the implementation of the management functions of staffing, directing, and controlling significantly lower than the DEOs; (3) DEOs ranked planning as number one in importance and faculty members ranked staffing as number one in importance; (4) DEOs and faculty members generally agreed that the department activity of providing an environment for creative efforts by staff was the most important department activity and that developing a plan for staff improvement was the least important department activity.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-5189

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Shelley Seim-Cassady

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8514438

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

184 pages

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