Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1986

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Agricultural Education and Studies

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess how limited-resource farmers in a selected area of North Carolina perceived the Farm Opportunities Program. The study developed a characteristics profile of Farm Opportunities Program farmers, identified improvements farmers in a selected area of North Carolina made in their farming practices and situations, determined perceived benefits farmers received from the Farm Opportunities Program, and tested relationships between farming improvements and perceived benefits;The population of the study was comprised of 167 limited-resource farmers who were participants of the Farm Opportunities Program and living in Franklin, Vance, and Warren Counties of North Carolina. A personal interview technique was used to collect data from farmers included in the sample. Since face-to-face contact was made between each farmer and the researcher, there was a 100 percent response rate;A four-part interview questionnaire was developed and used to collect data for the study. A 5-point Likert-type scale was used to collect information on agricultural assistance farmers received from sources other than the Farm Opportunities Program, farming improvements, and perceived benefits farmers received from the Farm Opportunities Program. Descriptive and inferential statistical procedures were used in analyzing the data;Major findings of the study were: (1) majority of the farmers were poorly educated, had limited production resources, and had low gross farm sales. Family and friends were the major sources of agricultural assistance farmers received other than the Farm Opportunities Program. (2) Farmers perceived they made slightly less than average improvements (barely below mid-point of five point scale) in their farming practices and situations. Least improvements were made in raising farm animals and marketing agricultural products. (3) In general, farmers perceived they received above average benefits from information pertaining to the production of cash crops and little benefits regarding raising farm animals, obtaining operating capital from gross farm sales, and gaining marketing skills. (4) Only slight and negligible relationships were observed between farming improvements and perceived benefits farmers received from the Farm Opportunities Program.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-11219

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

John Quinly Williams

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8615094

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

160 pages

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