Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1986

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

Abstract

This study is a descriptive analysis of the prison experience of female inmates in the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women at Mitchellville. Data for this study were collected and analyzed through a qualitative methodological approach. Prior research on women prisoners indicates that female inmates tend to organize into relatively enduring primary relationships, often involving dyadic homosexual attachments and extensive "kinship" networks. The present study examined a number of dimensions of the prison experience, including the fears and expectations that inmates had about prison before their arrival at Mitchellville; the change in the inmate's definition of the situation through her early participation in prison; the inmate's perceptions of the deprivations of incarceration; how inmates respond to the deprivation of incarceration; and the impact that relationships outside of prison have on the inmate's response to incarceration. What emerges from this study is that three primary modes of adaptation develop at Mitchellville in response to the pains of incarceration: quasi-families, couples, and rap-partnerships.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-6895

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Richard Statler Jones

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8703718

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

120 pages

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