Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1982

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Education

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual instructional and noninstructional outcomes of teacher collective bargaining in Iowa as viewed by selected Iowa elementary teachers, secondary teachers, superintendents, and board members. In addition, the study compared the actual instructional and noninstructional outcomes of teacher collective bargaining in Iowa as perceived by Iowa elementary teachers, secondary teachers, superintendents, and board members in 1982 with the expected instructional and noninstructional outcomes of teacher collective bargaining in Iowa as perceived by four similar groups who responded to a 1977 study;The questionnaire used to collect the data contained seventy-seven actual outcome statements which required a directional perception by the respondent as to whether teacher collective bargaining had improved (increased) or diminished (decreased) the instructional or noninstructional conditions posed and an intensity judgment, on a five-point contingency scale, which expressed how strongly the respondent felt the condition posed had been improved or diminished as a result of teacher collective bargaining. The seventy-seven actual outcome statements were grouped into ten scales for the purpose of data treatment and reporting;Superintendents and board members generally tended to believe that collective bargaining has been detrimental to education while teachers for the most part felt that collective bargaining has been beneficial to education. Most Iowa superintendents and board members from school districts absent certified bargaining units believed that collective bargaining was more detrimental to education than did their counterparts from bargaining districts. All four groups indicated that teacher bargaining has had a detrimental effect upon the views the public has of the profession, teachers' bargaining demands, and education in general;Interestingly, the study concluded that elementary teachers, secondary teachers, superintendents, and board members believed that the powers of boards of education in making decisions regarding the operation of schools has increased at least slightly as a result of teacher collective bargaining. This was a definite shift from the expected outcomes expressed 1977 when teachers, superintendents, and board members expected board authority to diminish.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-11958

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

David Keith Else

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8307744

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

169 pages

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