Degree Type

Thesis

Date of Award

2006

Degree Name

Master of Science

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Carolyn Cutrona

Abstract

In the event of family breakdown, removing the child from the home is one of the most common forms of state intervention, and is one of the primary interventions provided when a parent experiences severe problems related to caring for their children. This investigation examined predictors and consequences of the transition from one primary caregiver to another among African American youth. The sample consisted of African American children being raised by various members of their families including biological parents, relatives, and non-relatives. Respondents were participants in a large-scale study of African American children and their families, the Family and Community Health Study (FACHS). Children's level of depression and conduct disorder symptoms and school performance were assessed in order to compare the adjustment of children who reside with a biological parent compared to that of children who live with various other family members and non-relatives. Secondary data analysis revealed relatively few differences among children raised by various caregivers. Regardless of the caregiver relation to target, this study highlights the importance of a home environment that encourages a child's healthy behavioral and psychological development.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-9932

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu

Copyright Owner

Danielle Jacqueline Hill

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI1439893

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

65 pages

Share

COinS