Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1987

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Education

First Advisor

Larry H. Ebbers

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was threefold: (1) to discover whether or not selected demographic attitudinal and environmental factors, as well as non-work-related characteristics were related to employee job satisfaction; (2) to assess the job satisfaction among various employee groups; and (3) to identify any interaction between job satisfaction factors and employee groups;Subjects for this study were all (358) full-time budgeted blue collar and white collar employees in the Department of Residence at Iowa State University on January 1, 1987. The long form of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) the Employee Satisfaction Survey (ESS), were administered for data gathering purposes;Based on the data, issues related to children, job type and view of job appear to be related to employee job satisfaction. Several trends seem to emerge. Employees who had children living at home expressed significantly less job satisfaction than employees without children. Needing childcare for those children does not appear to impact on job satisfaction, however satisfaction with childcare arrangements does relate to job satisfaction. When the job satisfaction scores of room service and food service blue collar employees were combined, they expressed less job satisfaction than white collar employees, although when analyzed separately, this difference was significant solely among food service staff. Job type, (i.e., blue collar, white collar) however, was significant in relationship to view of job: almost twice as many white collar staff viewed their job as a career as blue collar staff. This finding is important considering the significant relationship between view of job and job satisfaction, i.e., employees who viewed their job as a career were more satisfied than employees who viewed their job as a paycheck. Although sex was not significant in any of the analyses, male white collar employees differed greatly from the other three groups of staff in how they viewed their job.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-11117

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Virginia C. Arthur

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8805041

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

159 pages

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