Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1989

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Agronomy

First Advisor

J. H. Dekker

Abstract

Visual ratings of percent injury indicated that exposure to tridiphane may increase herbicide-induced oxidative stress in field-grown plants. The objectives of these studies were to characterize the combined effects of tridiphane and paraquat-induced oxidative stress and to determine the physiological factors that underlie these combined effects. Field studies indicate that, under certain conditions, exposure to tridiphane can increase paraquat-induced leaf injury and inhibition of soybean plant height accumulation compared to the injury produced by paraquat applied alone. However, chlorophyll bleaching studies conducted in the field, and electrolyte leakage studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions indicate that exposure to tridiphane does not induce an oxidative stress or increase the potency of paraquat-induced oxidative stress in soybean leaf tissue. In addition, greenhouse studies indicated the combined effects of tridiphane and paraquat are additive both in terms of paraquat's effect on tridiphane activity and tridiphane's effect on paraquat activity. It was hypothesized that tridiphane-induced inhibition of new leaf growth and paraquat-induced oxidative stress in mature leaf tissue combine to retard the recovery of soybean plants from herbicide injury, and may increase plant mortality. Investigations of the effects of tridiphane on soybean leaf growth and structural development indicate that tridiphane primarily affects growing and developing leaf tissue and thus may inhibit recovery from herbicide injury.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-8909

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Christopher Paul Dionigi

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI8920125

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

96 pages

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