Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1990

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Family Environment

First Advisor

Rosalie Huisinga Norem

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to explore the interplay between (a) the stress process and (b) family functioning. The research examines differences in the stress process as it plays itself out in balanced, midrange, and extreme families, as measured by FACES II. It is the thesis of this study that the stress process proceeds differently in different kinds of families. The data come from a 9-state North Central Regional Project entitled "Stress in Families in their Middle Years." Two specific studies are included in the dissertation:;Study 1. An examination of differences in the stress process in balanced, midrange, and extreme families using multi-sample LISREL analysis. This cross-sectional study examines the differences in the relationship between stressors and manifestations of stress for balanced, midrange, and extreme families. Stressors are measured by indices of both life events and daily hassles. Manifestations of stress are measured by respondent's health status, family health status, and respondent's life satisfaction. The study uses multi-sample LISREL analysis to address the question of families' relative vulnerability to stress-related symptoms. The sample is made up of 927 couples, with data matched for husband and wife. Findings of this study support the hypothesis that the relationships among variables in the stress process do change, depending on family type;Study 2. A longitudinal study of the stress process in balanced, midrange, and extreme families. This study employs standardized multiple regression analysis of longitudinal data to investigate variations over time in the relationship between stressors and stress manifestations for 3 types of families and examines differences between families whose Circumplex type is stable over time and those who change type over time. Stressors are measured by an index of life events, and indicators of manifestations of stress are respondent's health status and family health status. The sample is made up of 214 couples, with data matched for wife and husband. Findings suggest that health status at Time 1 is a better predictor of health status at Time 2 than is life events, either as reported at Time 1 or at Time 2. The findings also indicate that the basic relationships among variables in the model do not change based on family type. There is, however, a difference in the basic relationship depending on whether or not the family type is stable over time. The relationship between life events and health status is stronger for stable family types than for families which change types.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-9139

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Julia A. Malia

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9100449

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

182 pages

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