Degree Type

Dissertation

Date of Award

1990

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Meg Gerrard

Second Advisor

Rick Gibbons

Abstract

The present study examined the effects of gender and status on self-reported likelihood of power strategy use. Female and male subjects reported the likelihood of their taking each of 24 actions in order to influence a male or female target of lower, equal or higher status. Subjects also rated the perceived effectiveness and desirability of each of the influence tactics. Based upon Falbo and Peplau's two-dimensional model (1980), four types of power strategies were identified: bilateral, unilateral, direct and indirect. As predicted, persons of lower status were more likely to be the recipients of direct strategies than persons of higher status. Lower status targets were also more likely to be the recipients of unilateral strategies than higher status targets, but only when the target person was male. Overall, the effects of status of the target were more salient and consistent than effects due to gender of target. Gender of subject had little effect on likelihood of power strategy use;Reference. Falbo, T., & Peplau, L. A. (1980). Power strategies in intimate relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 618-628.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/rtd-180813-9401

Publisher

Digital Repository @ Iowa State University, http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/

Copyright Owner

Robin Elizabeth Nelson

Language

en

Proquest ID

AAI9110544

File Format

application/pdf

File Size

99 pages

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