Publication Date

January 2001

Abstract

There is growing concern among public health experts regarding the diminishing efficacy of antimicrobial therapy in human and veterinary medicine, and some have called for a ban on subtherapeutic antibiotic use in pork production. This paper develops an econometric analysis to identify the economic contributions of subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in swine production. Using data from the 1990 and 1995 NAHMS National Swine Surveys, linear regression models were estimated to identify the relationships between feedgrade antibiotic use and other factors of production on productivity and mortality in the grower/finisher phase. Empirical results indicate that average daily gain and feed conversion ratio are improved by 0.9% and 2.3%, respectively, while grower/finisher mortality is improved 0.29 percentage points. The results also suggest that tailored rations can serve as a substitute for subtherapeutic antibiotics. Additional research on the relationships between productivity and feedgrade antibiotics in modern U.S. pork production systems is warranted.

Book Title

Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on the Epidemiology and Control of Salmonella and other Food Borne Pathogens in Pork

Pages

399-402

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/safepork-180809-1148

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Productivity and Economic Impacts of Feedgrade Antimicrobial Use in Pork Production

Leipzig, Germany

There is growing concern among public health experts regarding the diminishing efficacy of antimicrobial therapy in human and veterinary medicine, and some have called for a ban on subtherapeutic antibiotic use in pork production. This paper develops an econometric analysis to identify the economic contributions of subtherapeutic antimicrobial use in swine production. Using data from the 1990 and 1995 NAHMS National Swine Surveys, linear regression models were estimated to identify the relationships between feedgrade antibiotic use and other factors of production on productivity and mortality in the grower/finisher phase. Empirical results indicate that average daily gain and feed conversion ratio are improved by 0.9% and 2.3%, respectively, while grower/finisher mortality is improved 0.29 percentage points. The results also suggest that tailored rations can serve as a substitute for subtherapeutic antibiotics. Additional research on the relationships between productivity and feedgrade antibiotics in modern U.S. pork production systems is warranted.