Publication Date

January 2011

Abstract

In Germany, it has been reported that up to 86% of pig farmers are colonized with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the nares, at least intermittently. However, little is known about the long-term persistence of colonization, especially when the farmers do not have daily contact to pigs. Here, we analyzed whether an absence from work during the summer holidays had an impact on nasal MRSA colonization rates of pig farmers.

Book Title

33rd International Conference on the Epidemiology and Control of Biological, Chemical and Physical Hazards in Pigs and Pork

Pages

92-95

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/safepork-180809-585

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Does nasal colonization with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pig farmers persist after holidays from pig exposure?

Maastricht, Netherlands

In Germany, it has been reported that up to 86% of pig farmers are colonized with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the nares, at least intermittently. However, little is known about the long-term persistence of colonization, especially when the farmers do not have daily contact to pigs. Here, we analyzed whether an absence from work during the summer holidays had an impact on nasal MRSA colonization rates of pig farmers.