Publication Date

January 2011

Abstract

Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric disease in humans. In pigs Clostridium difficile can cause neonatal enteritis and can be isolated from faeces from diseased and healthy animals. According to recent research, isolates from humans and animals show genetic and phenotypic overlap. In The Netherlands, strains isolated from diseased piglets were indistinguishable from strains isolated from Dutch patients. These strains belonged to ribotype 078. Because pigs can either be clinical hosts and/or may be a possible reservoir more understanding of the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile among pigs is needed. The objectives of this study were to specify whether, how and when newborn piglets get infected by Clostridium difficile for the first time. With this intention, six sows, their farrowing crates and litters (71 piglets) at one farm were sampled around the day of birth of the piglets. Within 48 hours after birth, all sampled 71 piglets at the farm became positive for Clostridium difficile ribotype 078. Moreover, all sows became positive within 113 hours after birth of the piglets and the farrowing crates were intermittently positive during the sampling period. This research shows that the sow, the farrowing crate, the air and the teats of the sow are possible transmission routes of Clostridium difficile ribotype 078.This information might help to advise farmers on taking measures against Clostridium difficile infections in neonatal piglets.

Book Title

72nd International Conference on the Epidemiology and Control of Biological, Chemical and Physical Hazards in Pigs and Pork

Pages

211-213

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/safepork-180809-624

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Clostridium difficile in a farrowing pen

Maastricht, Netherlands

Clostridium difficile is an important cause of enteric disease in humans. In pigs Clostridium difficile can cause neonatal enteritis and can be isolated from faeces from diseased and healthy animals. According to recent research, isolates from humans and animals show genetic and phenotypic overlap. In The Netherlands, strains isolated from diseased piglets were indistinguishable from strains isolated from Dutch patients. These strains belonged to ribotype 078. Because pigs can either be clinical hosts and/or may be a possible reservoir more understanding of the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile among pigs is needed. The objectives of this study were to specify whether, how and when newborn piglets get infected by Clostridium difficile for the first time. With this intention, six sows, their farrowing crates and litters (71 piglets) at one farm were sampled around the day of birth of the piglets. Within 48 hours after birth, all sampled 71 piglets at the farm became positive for Clostridium difficile ribotype 078. Moreover, all sows became positive within 113 hours after birth of the piglets and the farrowing crates were intermittently positive during the sampling period. This research shows that the sow, the farrowing crate, the air and the teats of the sow are possible transmission routes of Clostridium difficile ribotype 078.This information might help to advise farmers on taking measures against Clostridium difficile infections in neonatal piglets.