Publication Date

January 2011

Abstract

The risk of listeriosis associated with ready-to-eat foods is a major concern in United States. The recently published United States regulations require ready-to-eat meat producers to control Listeria monocytogenes, using interventions which may include antimicrobials that reduce post-processing contamination by at least 1 log cycle and that no more than 1 log increase throughout product shelf life. This regulation impact also the Spanish meat producers especially dry cured sausages, which export their products to USA. In this study, we analyzed in vitro, individually and in combinations, the commonly applied antimicrobials to reduce Listeria. Performing in-vitro experiment before applying directly on dry cured sausages offer us the benefits such as time and cost saving.

Book Title

94th International Conference on the Epidemiology and Control of Biological, Chemical and Physical Hazards in Pigs and Pork

Pages

283-285

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/safepork-180809-645

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

In-vitro experiment of Listeria reduction in ready-to-eat dry cured sausages

Maastricht, Netherlands

The risk of listeriosis associated with ready-to-eat foods is a major concern in United States. The recently published United States regulations require ready-to-eat meat producers to control Listeria monocytogenes, using interventions which may include antimicrobials that reduce post-processing contamination by at least 1 log cycle and that no more than 1 log increase throughout product shelf life. This regulation impact also the Spanish meat producers especially dry cured sausages, which export their products to USA. In this study, we analyzed in vitro, individually and in combinations, the commonly applied antimicrobials to reduce Listeria. Performing in-vitro experiment before applying directly on dry cured sausages offer us the benefits such as time and cost saving.