Editor

Jean Goodwin, Michael F. Dahlstrom, and Susanna Priest

Description

Science communication emerges from social contexts in which the value of popular support for science and technology (S&T) is presumed. This article does not dispute the assertion that S&T is “good” but does assume that people should make free and informed choices about it, explored here using nanotechnology. This problematizes the purpose of science communication and suggests the need to reconceptualize science literacy as having critical dimensions.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/sciencecommunication-180809-45

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Communication Commons

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Can Strategic and Democratic Goals Coexist in Communicating Science? Nanotechnology as a Case Study in the Ethics of Science Communication and the Need for “Critical” Science Literacy

Science communication emerges from social contexts in which the value of popular support for science and technology (S&T) is presumed. This article does not dispute the assertion that S&T is “good” but does assume that people should make free and informed choices about it, explored here using nanotechnology. This problematizes the purpose of science communication and suggests the need to reconceptualize science literacy as having critical dimensions.

 

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