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Disclosure of authorial conflicts of interest have become a cornerstone of scientific publication, championed as a sensible middle ground between extremes of categorical prohibition of for-profit research or acceptance of findings regardless of origins. Elliott argues that while some interests may be biasing, others are not; so we must assess how interests affect research credibility, and Elliott proposes criteria to refine disclosure policies. Here I evaluate Elliott’s proposed criteria as they apply to community-based research, drawing on the United Church of Christ’s study on toxic waste and race as a paradigm case of interested yet trustworthy research.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/sciencecommunication-180809-95

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Conflicts of Interest, Community-based Research, and Trustworthy Science Communication

Disclosure of authorial conflicts of interest have become a cornerstone of scientific publication, championed as a sensible middle ground between extremes of categorical prohibition of for-profit research or acceptance of findings regardless of origins. Elliott argues that while some interests may be biasing, others are not; so we must assess how interests affect research credibility, and Elliott proposes criteria to refine disclosure policies. Here I evaluate Elliott’s proposed criteria as they apply to community-based research, drawing on the United Church of Christ’s study on toxic waste and race as a paradigm case of interested yet trustworthy research.

 

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